[H] [1] [2] [3] [4] [6] [7] [8] [9] [10] [11]

* * Contact

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Gone but Not Forgotten_2007

Gone but Not Forgotten explores
how photographic images could
be utilised to
explore the complexities
of visual production and movement
in cities over time.

Photography fosters the development
of visual identity. People can consider
their cultural aspirations, dreams, and
environmental fears, find common
ground and form new communal
connections with their every day
lives and the landscapes they occupy.

Weather patterns affect people’s
mental and physical journeys on foot
or inside vehicles. Climatic conditions
can both speed up or slow down mobility,
with the potential to restrict movement
and interaction in urban and rural landscapes.
Moisture, wind direction and chill factor
can physically and psychologically
affect visibility and movement.
This productive tension affects social
relations across time and space.

The photographic work explores how
the prosaic and habitual fabric of
what is culturally perceived as a natural
and urban landscape is used to provoke
the viewer to question collective mobility,
personal identity and narrative structures
within the city and its boundaries.